Kootenay Camas Project Publications:

Camas at the Confluence:  Where Ecology and Culture Meet at Kp’ítl’els (Valerie Huff, Eva Johansson, 2012)
The land surrounding the confluence of the Kootenay River and the Columbia River may once have been a highly productive camas meadow.  Read the full Menziesia article.

Columbia River Basin Biodiversity Atlas:  Common Camas
Camas featured on the Columbia River Basin Biodiversity Atlas.
http://biodiversityatlas.org/species/camas.php

Kootenay Camas Project 2012:  Camas Inventory and Density Maps (Kylie Morin, 2012)
Maps produced from the 2012 Kootenay Camas Project field season
http://www.sgrc.selkirk.ca/bioatlas/pdf/CamasMapsReport.pdf

Recommended Reading:

Native Plant Propagation Guidelines: Camassia quamash (common camas).  (Garry oak ecosystems recovery team)
http://www.goert.ca/propagation_guidelines/forbs/camassia_quamash

Camas.  Camas serve double duty – with exceptional beauty and an exotic taste.  (Richard Hebda)
http://www.gardenwiseonline.ca/gw/plants/2002/05/19/camas#ixzz1ovQpXhGo

Protecting our natives:  Habitat loss and invading exotic species are threatening what remains of the native vegetation found in the Garry oak ecosystem. 
http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/so06/indepth/nature.asp

Spring Lilies.  Sunshine Coast Botanical Garden Society
http://www.coastbotanicalgarden.org/article_spring_lilies.shtml

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History: Camassia quamash (Pursh) Greene.  Small camas. 
The cultivation, processing and trade of camas bulb is a prime example of how Indians used native plants to sustain themselves and for trade with others, including with the Lewis and Clark expedition…
http://www.mnh.si.edu/lewisandclark/resources/Camassia_quamash.pdf